Stonehenge Monument

See a recreation of how Stonehenge may have been raised 4500 years ago. Stonehenge Decoded: SUN JUNE 1 9P : channel.nationalgeographic.com

Comments

  1. vincegill2 says:

    The spiral rock carvings represent the spiral energy forms of the many underground streams which amplify the geo-magnetic and solar energy, especially during the Equinoxes. It is part of a large energy network of stone temples, obilisks and pyramids that span the globe, similar to our modern telecommunications system.

  2. pogpog28 says:

    Stonehenge was created as a meeting place for people who practice witchcraft. Europe before was full of BS when it comes to that.

  3. 10Feanor says:

    Happy Solstice Everyone!

    (21 June´╗┐ 2011)

  4. BlueNem0 says:

    @paperorpaper ­čśÇ most probably texas hold’em, full-tilt may have been too harsh lol i’d laugh if it was like “last one to stand up a stone does the cooking tonight!!” and for centuries professors, doctors, engineers still wonderin y it was built.

  5. MrDaleaaaa says:

    @10Feanor go to a documentery about chaocho canyon (national geographics i think you can also see a corasponding change in weather .i don’t know of an 11.5 its the minium.maximum cycle .in 1987 i think the moon was at the minimum.don’t listen to propaganda find out

  6. 10Feanor says:

    @MrDaleaaaa
    Iconographic Monuments such as Stonehenge, the Pyramids or Gobleki Tepi, to name 3, were not the work of slave-labor. These multi-generational buildings came from the labor-force of a willing populace. Sort of a DPW. Egypt never even had slaves until very late in its history – long after the Pyramids were finished.
    The concept of wage-slaves in modern times has an entirely different social motivation.
    Building a modern Stonehenge would be irrelevant to our belief-systems today.

  7. 10Feanor says:

    I have a sense that MrDaleaaa’s 1st language is not English, so it might be difficult to understand most of what he’s trying to convey.
    That said, although it’s true that the Moon has an 11.5 year cycle, it also has recurrent (and interesting) cycles with regard to orbital anomalies & horizonal configs with regard to apo- & perigee that seem to be in keeping with the seemingly peculiar placement of the Station Stones at Stonehenge.
    The people who designed & built it were really quite bright.

  8. Spedster777 says:

    @MrDaleaaaa I don’t think somebody who can’t spell or cannot user proper conventions and grammar can possibly work with people “who could do stuff like stone henge” (BTW that makes no sense).

    I am not correcting you on your stonehenge information, as I do not know much about the monument itself. I am correcting you on your astronomical data.

    The Moon doesn’t have a 18.5 year cycle or a 9.25 year cycle. It has a 11.5 year cycle, no other cycle except for the monthly phase cycle.

  9. MrDaleaaaa says:

    @Spedster777 you say that i’m wrong but you don’t site any info on the subject .i have worked with people that could do those things like stone henge all the need is the labors they can’t do it now because you can’t outwordly inslave people so that makes it to much money to do .as for your points i see no sense to yours there has been no end to slavery it just changes names

  10. Spedster777 says:

    @MrDaleaaaa
    1. Most of that information is wrong.
    2. You make no sense.
    3. You have no idea what you are talking about.
    4. TITS OR GTFO

  11. paperorpaper says:

    @BlueNem0 haha!

  12. BlueNem0 says:

    stonehenge was built for poker contests

  13. 10Feanor says:

    @MrDaleaaaa
    … I have NO idea what you just said …

  14. MrDaleaaaa says:

    @10Feanor the moon has a 18.5 year cycle and a 9.25 cycle so do earth quaks ask the japanes what book would you recomend .the referance to the sky is falling mean fear mugering .to emprov my spelling their would have to be no dyslexia.and i would have to take a typing class.and there is still slavery its called minimum wage the slave owner don’t have to care for their slavs that way.and i bet that was an esult so eat shit and die if it wasn’t then you have my deepest apolloge

  15. 10Feanor says:

    @Saxonsoldiers
    As is often the case in these matters, I must have been confused, yes. My esteemed sources assure me that using Spinal Tap and Monty Python as anchors for my studious research is the solid approach.
    I do find it interesting that shortly after the Rendlesham affair these pesky Crop-Circles began to show up, bolstering the argument that Senior Intelligences are at work to create the preposterous supposition that the Great Henge was completed by Humans in the 2nd Millennium BC.

  16. Saxonsoldiers says:

    @10Feanor Dont know if you were tuned into the tv or something when you quoted “ERICK Von Daniken” but its “Chariots of the Gods” not “Skateboards” lol. Maybe you were watching something about Skate boarding that filtered through to your typing? Its happened to me before too lmao.

  17. sonofherne says:

    @10Feanor LoL Good one! ­čśë

  18. 10Feanor says:

    @sonofherne
    Preposterous twaddle. You appear´╗┐ to be entirely ignorant of the definitive thesis expounded by Derek Von Heineken in “Skateboards of the Gods!”, incontrovertibly demonstrating that Stonehenge represents the remains of a game of Mah Jongg abandoned by hyper-intelligent beings from the Sirius star system after they got bored and went back to playing pool with the planets. Yours is precisely the kind of half-baked claptrap that brings serious´╗┐ research into disrepute.

  19. sonofherne says:

    @FLSHBK1 The first fell @1000bc at the decline of the monument & culture. Maybe there just wasn’t the religious need or the knowledge able to replace it. Built 1000yrs earlier, that’s a lot of generations past to forget,and maybe the exact techniques used were kept secret? This was at the beginning of the Iron Age then which brought huge religious and social change. Climatically the weather deteriorated and there was plague and disease.Maybe there wasn’t the need for these type of monuments?

  20. sonofherne says:

    @JohnJuanUnited Thinking outside of the box is all well and good, but don’t assume we’re all morons here who don’t know Stonehenge or the landscape. I’ve been living around SH for years. I can tell you – there’s no mountains to chip off the stone from. these stones are not native to the area. They are North Wiltshire grey wether. The heel stone is the only likely to have always been there, because it’s not sarsen. Also you ignore Bluestone which is only found in Wales, 150miles away.

  21. sonofherne says:

    @JohnJuanUnited Sarsen stones (the larger stones at SH) were common around Wiltshire (where SH is) Hampshire & Dorset & probably even more abundant in the neolithic. A lot was utilised in the last 1000yrs for building thus removing much of the evidence, The Marlborough Downs however (20miles) is now the only area nearby SH with the highest density of stones and these same ones were utilised for building Avebury Stone Circle, much bigger than SH. As you say, the simple answer is the right one.

  22. sonofherne says:

    @JorgeLorenzoSpain100 Some of them are! Isotope testing of some of the remains around SH recently has showed that people from the Bronze age definately entered Britain through Iberia. Some of the richest burials have Breton/Iberian roots. Breton daggers have been found, we even have a carving on a stone called the “iberian torso.”
    I’m fascinated with the Basque peoples and their language. You are welcome to contact me. I’d like to ask you some questions.

  23. JorgeLorenzoSpain100 says:

    The researches of R. Frank, a scholar at the University of Iowa, suggest that the Basques were far-advanced´╗┐ in navigational skills and other aspects of technology long before the rise of the Roman Empire. The Basques, she believes, are the last remnants of the megalith builders, who left behind dolmens, standing stones, and other rock structures all across Europe and perhaps even in eastern North America.

  24. JorgeLorenzoSpain100 says:

    The Basques are the original Europeans and they( i am Basque) are really adventurous people so i wouldnt be surprised if these people were related to Basques.

  25. michaelkphil says:

    the narrator does not sound good. mumbling the words. had hard time undersanding him, i dont know. maybe its just me.

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